MANSFIELD’S INJURY LAWYER

Medical Malpractice

Studies claim medical malpractice is more common than thought

Most people know that medical malpractice can happen. They know that doctors make mistakes, for instance, and that patients may pass away from these mistakes or have life-altering injuries. People also know that errors can be made at many levels of care. For example, a nurse could give someone improper medication or a surgeon could operate on the wrong site. But many people think of these events as very rare occurrences. The vast majority of the time that you go to the hospital, no negative events are going to occur, they believe. And while this may be true in a percentage sense – in that...

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Why communication is so important in hospitals

All of us need medical intervention at some point in our lives. Sometimes, this is very minor but it can also be for serious and even life-threatening conditions. As the stakes are so high, it is important that doctors and other medical staff are well-trained and act with the utmost professionalism.  Part of these wider responsibilities includes communicating with each other about patients, treatments and other pertinent information. If communication breaks down, then the quality of treatment offered to patients can dramatically increase.  Outlined below are some of the more specific reasons...

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If you feel like your doctor doesn’t listen to you, you may be right

Doctor's appointments are often frustrating experiences. You call and make an appointment for much farther off in the future than you would like. You wait for your appointment day, and then you often wait after arriving for your appointment. Even after you go back into the medical examination room, you may wait more there for a doctor to actually talk to you. Before you ever see a medical doctor, you may explain your symptoms or concerns to a nurse, a receptionist and several other staff members. When you finally see your doctor, you might expect that they would make use of that information...

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A doctor did not get your informed consent. Is that malpractice?

A doctor must obtain your informed consent prior to conducting a medical procedure or administering treatment. The punishment for not doing so is very significant. In fact, according to Forbes, “Failure to obtain informed consent is unlawful—medical malpractice, specifically—and the doctor can be charged with negligence and battery.” Informed consent means that you have been made fully aware of the potential risks, side effects and possible outcomes of an operation, procedure or treatment. You can grant your approval for the doctor to go ahead. You also have the right to decline what the...

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What cancer misdiagnosis is such a major health care concern

No one wants to hear their doctor diagnose them with cancer. For some, cancer is a terminal diagnosis, meaning it will cost them their lives. For others, they can fight the cancer, but they will have to undergo surgery and invasive treatments like chemotherapy to achieve remission. However frightening a doctor diagnosing you with cancer might be, their failure to diagnose you is a much more serious concern. When a doctor ignores or downplays your symptoms, your cancer could progress before you secure the correct diagnosis. Some forms of cancers spread quickly When you go to your doctor to...

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Rushed doctors can lead to serious mistakes

Does your doctor always seem rushed when you go into the office? Do you feel like they hurry in the door, still thinking about whatever they were doing prior to meeting with you, and then rush out as soon as they can to get on to the next appointment? It's not just in your head. The majority of patients –  three out of five –  believe that even their exams are rushed. Some reports claim that people may only get to talk for as little as 12 seconds before being interrupted by a medical professional when they first start the meeting. In short, your doctor is definitely in a rush and that could...

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Surgeons don’t always get it right 

It takes several years of training to qualify as a surgeon. Thus, surgeons must acquire high levels of expertise prior to being permitted to operate on patients.  The relationship between medical professionals and patients is founded upon trust. Those who enter healthcare facilities for treatment often place their lives in the hands of the people who care for them. Sadly, even the most highly trained professionals are not immune from errors, even surgeons. The consequences of errors during surgery can be life-altering and even fatal in extreme cases. Outlined below are some of the more...

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Tips for patients: Avoiding ER mistakes

Going to the emergency room (ER) is scary. Not only are you having a medical crisis (which is frightening enough), you have to contend with the fact that the doctors you see aren’t going to be familiar with you or your medical history. Given that an estimated 250,000 people die every year in the United States due to medical mistakes, you need to take precautions. What can you do to protect yourself? If you have health problems, you’re actually in a better position to protect yourself from medical errors than someone who has a sudden health crisis. You can prepare in advance. Here’s what you...

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Could you be vulnerable to medication errors?

While you may understand why a consumer would make a mistake with prescription medications, you may have difficulty fathoming how a medical provider could do the same. It happens quite frequently, however, for a variety of reasons.  You should take time to learn more about how these mistakes occur to do your part to ensure that it doesn't affect you. Who makes medication errors and how? Medication errors can happen at various stages within the supply chain before it makes it to the patient, from the prescribing to compounding to the administration ones. Errors can happen at the hands of:...

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What’s an affidavit of merit in an Ohio medical malpractice claim?

Medical malpractice can lead to absolutely devastating personal injuries -- but they aren’t treated quite like other personal injury claims. Per the Ohio Revised Code, your medical malpractice claim can’t even begin until you obtain an “Affidavit of Merit” from a physician, specialist or another expert witness. Why do you need an Affidavit of Merit? Why do you have to jump through an extra hoop or two to file a medical malpractice claim?  Officially, this requirement helps weed out “frivolous” cases that don’t have any real merit and would otherwise clog up the court system.  In practice, it...

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